Seven continents, one home: Kew Gardens in Britain

05:09

Kew Gardens is not only a popular tourist destination in London, but also a botanical garden and research center that has the largest collection of living plants on a single site. So, let’s explore the Royal Botanic Gardens with CGTN’s Roybn Dwyer.

Roybn Dwyer at the Palm House. /Video screenshot

Roybn Dwyer at the Palm House. /Video screenshot

Palm grove

The first stop is the Palm House, a giant indoor rainforest with a wide array of plants. Visitors can enjoy these exotic plants while researchers can study the secrets of these floras. Edible plants such as cocoa tree and African oil palm are all kept here to maintain the diversity of food resources. At the same time, it is home to many medicinal plants, some of which are used to treat cancer.

Madagascar periwinkle at the Palmeraie. /Video screenshot

Madagascar periwinkle at the Palmeraie. /Video screenshot

temperate house

Known as the largest Victorian glasshouse in the world, the Temperate House is home to 1,500 species of plants from the temperate regions of the world. Some of the species kept here have become extinct in the wild, such as Encephalartos woodii, a cycad from South Africa. And some are already extinct like the olive tree of Saint Helena, but the Kew has retained its DNA.

The temperate house. /Video screenshot

The temperate house. /Video screenshot

Mediterranean Garden

In the Mediterranean Garden, you can see plants from southern Europe, such as rosemary, olive and cork oak. Walking through the garden, one can feel the Mediterranean vibe and learn about the economic uses of these plants.

A glimpse of the Mediterranean garden /Video screenshot

A glimpse of the Mediterranean garden /Video screenshot

“The biggest risk to our biodiversity right now is the loss of habitats, the loss of our natural system and our vegetation,” said Eimear M Nic Lughadha, senior researcher at Kew Gardens.

Kew cooperates with other institutions around the world, such as Germplasm Bank of Wild Species in Kunming, southwest China’s Yunnan Province, to work on both education and conservation and fight against the loss of biodiversity.

Eimear M Nic Lughadha, Senior Researcher at Kew Gardens. /Video screenshot

Eimear M Nic Lughadha, Senior Researcher at Kew Gardens. /Video screenshot

About the series “Seven Continents, One Home”:

On the International Day for Biological Diversity this year, join CGTN in traveling through national parks and reserves around the world on seven continents. Visit the “national treasure” of giant pandas in Shaanxi Qinling in China, koalas and kangaroos in Australia, towering redwoods in America, the Royal Botanical Garden in Britain, lions and elephants in the African savannah and the penguins and seals on the Antarctic ice. Let’s walk in nature and get to know our nature friends!

For more:

Seven continents, one home: Kenya’s Amboseli National Park

Live: International Day for Biological Diversity – Seven Continents One Home

Trailer: Go on an adventure on the seven continents with wildlife!

(Cover image via CFP. Video filmed by CGTN Europe.)

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